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Irène Joliot-Curie













































About Irène Joliot-Curie

French scientist who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1935 for her and her husband s discovery of artificial radioactivity.In 1946 she was accidentally expose to polonium, the chemical element that her parents discovered in 1898, and many believe that this exposure caused her death from leukemia ten years later.


Early life

She studied at the Faculty of Science at the Sorbonne until World War I broke out.


Trivia

Both of her parents were scientists and both of her children are as well.


Family of Irène Joliot-Curie

She won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with her husband Frederic Joliot-Curie in 1935, nine years after they married.


Close associates of Irène Joliot-Curie

Madame Curie is her mother and a fellow Nobel Laureate.





















Glenn T. Seaborg













































About Glenn T. Seaborg

Winner of the 1951 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery of plutonium and transuranium, which is heavier than uranium. He was also the Chairman of the United States Atomic Energy Commission from 1961 to 1971.


Early life

During WW II he was in charge of scaling up plutonium production and after the war chaired the Atomic Energy Commission.


Trivia

He helped develop the atom bomb, but co-signed a letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt urging him to demonstrate the weapon to the Japanese rather than using it on them; and spent his whole career campaigning for peaceful uses of atomic energy.


Family of Glenn T. Seaborg

He was born in Ishpeming, Michigan, the son of a Swedish immigrant mother, who he later saved with one of his discoveries.


Close associates of Glenn T. Seaborg

He was an advisor to a succession of U.S. presidents, starting from FDR and ending with President George Bush in the 1980s.





















Lauri Vaska













































About Lauri Vaska

An Estonian chemist who is best known for his work in the field of organometallic chemistry. He became a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1981.


Early life

He studied at the Baltic University in Hamburg, Germany and at the Universitat Gottingen.


Trivia

He was given the Boris Pregel Award for Research in Chemical Physics in 1971.


Family of Lauri Vaska

His brother, Vootele Vaska, is a philosopher.


Close associates of Lauri Vaska

He was born in the same country as writer Ants Oras.





















Francis William Aston













































About Francis William Aston

A British chemist who won the 1922 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discovering isotopes in a large number of non-radioactive elements. He was also the first to fully formulate the whole number rule, which posits that the masses of isotopes are whole number multiples of the mass of a given hydrogen atom.


Early life

He worked on fermentation chemistry at the school of brewing in Birmingham, and was later employed by W. Butler & Co. Brewery.


Trivia

The lunar crater Aston was named in his honour.


Family of Francis William Aston

He had two siblings.


Close associates of Francis William Aston

He played golf with his colleague Ernest Rutherford.





















Cynthia A. Maryanoff













































About Cynthia A. Maryanoff

Chemist and inventor who previously worked with Johnson & Johnson pharmaceutical units. In her long career she has been awarded over fifty US patents.


Early life

She attended Drexel University and Princeton University.


Trivia

She has published over 100 scientific articles.


Family of Cynthia A. Maryanoff

She was married to Dr. Bruce E. Maryanoff for 33 years.


Close associates of Cynthia A. Maryanoff

She was influenced by Louis Pasteur.





















Clair Cameron Patterson













































About Clair Cameron Patterson

His new uranium-lead dating method led to the first accurate measurement of the Earth s age, which was estimated to be 4.55 billion years. Because of his revolutionary research lead levels within the blood of Americans are reported to have dropped by up to 80% by the late 1990s.


Early life

He worked on the Manhattan Project during World War II, first at the University of Chicago and later at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.


Trivia

His discovery also led the finding that tetra-ethyl lead, a common additive to car fuel at the time, was toxic, and he campaigned for its removal.


Family of Clair Cameron Patterson

He met his wife Laurie McCleary at Grinnell College, where both were students.


Close associates of Clair Cameron Patterson

Like him, Vannevar Bush worked on the Manhattan Project.