South  Korea|Ban Ki|Moon

South Korea|Ban Ki|Moon

Concluded Personality is ISFP

Current net worth Forbes$1.50 million 

Ban Ki-Moon, (born June 13, 1944, Ŭmsŏng, Japanese-occupied Korea [now in South Korea]), South Korean diplomat and politician, who served as the eighth secretary-general (2007–16) of the United Nations (UN).

At age 18 Ban won a competition that took him to the White House to meet U.S. Pres. John F. Kennedy, a visit that Ban claimed inspired his public career. He received a bachelor’s degree (1970) in international relations from Seoul National University and earned a master’s degree (1985) from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. After entering South Korea’s foreign service in 1970, he served as counselor to the embassy in Washington, D.C. (1987–90), director of American affairs at the Foreign Ministry (1990–92), deputy foreign minister (1995–96), and national security adviser to the president (1996–98). Following a stint as ambassador to Austria (1998–2000), Ban returned to Seoul as vice-minister of foreign affairs (2000–01). In 2003 he became foreign policy adviser to the new president, Roh Moo Hyun. As minister of foreign affairs and trade from 2004 to 2006, Ban played a key role in the six-party talks aimed at denuclearizing North Korea.

Ban’s UN experience began in 1975 when he became a staff member of the UN division of the Foreign Ministry in Seoul. In the late 1970s, when South Korea had only observer status, Ban was posted to the South Korean mission to the UN. In 1999 he served as chairman of the preparatory commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization. Ban also led the cabinet of the president of the UN General Assembly during South Korea’s tenure of the rotating presidency in 2001–02, the critical period following the terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, 2001 (see September 11 attacks).

On October 13, 2006, just days after North Korea tested a nuclear weapon, Ban was named UN secretary-general-elect. Though Ban’s quiet demeanour led some observers to question his ability to take on the daunting challenges facing the UN, others characterized him as an astute consensus builder who would be able to work effectively with both the Americans and the Chinese. Ban succeeded Kofi Annan on January 1, 2007, becoming the first Asian to serve as UN secretary-general since Burmese statesman U Thant held the office (1962–71). Ban faced a number of challenges, including the North Korean and Iranian nuclear threats, troubles in the Middle East, and the humanitarian crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan. Reform of the UN itself was also a major issue. In 2011 Ban was elected to a second term.

 

 

Ban Ki-Moon, (born June 13, 1944, Ŭmsŏng, Japanese-occupied Korea [now in South Korea]), South Korean diplomat and politician, who served as the eighth secretary-general (2007–16) of the United Nations (UN).

At age 18 Ban won a competition that took him to the White House to meet U.S. Pres. John F. Kennedy, a visit that Ban claimed inspired his public career. He received a bachelor’s degree (1970) in international relations from Seoul National University and earned a master’s degree (1985) from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. After entering South Korea’s foreign service in 1970, he served as counselor to the embassy in Washington, D.C. (1987–90), director of American affairs at the Foreign Ministry (1990–92), deputy foreign minister (1995–96), and national security adviser to the president (1996–98). Following a stint as ambassador to Austria (1998–2000), Ban returned to Seoul as vice-minister of foreign affairs (2000–01). In 2003 he became foreign policy adviser to the new president, Roh Moo Hyun. As minister of foreign affairs and trade from 2004 to 2006, Ban played a key role in the six-party talks aimed at denuclearizing North Korea.

Ban’s UN experience began in 1975 when he became a staff member of the UN division of the Foreign Ministry in Seoul. In the late 1970s, when South Korea had only observer status, Ban was posted to the South Korean mission to the UN. In 1999 he served as chairman of the preparatory commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization. Ban also led the cabinet of the president of the UN General Assembly during South Korea’s tenure of the rotating presidency in 2001–02, the critical period following the terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, 2001 (see September 11 attacks).

On October 13, 2006, just days after North Korea tested a nuclear weapon, Ban was named UN secretary-general-elect. Though Ban’s quiet demeanour led some observers to question his ability to take on the daunting challenges facing the UN, others characterized him as an astute consensus builder who would be able to work effectively with both the Americans and the Chinese. Ban succeeded Kofi Annan on January 1, 2007, becoming the first Asian to serve as UN secretary-general since Burmese statesman U Thant held the office (1962–71). Ban faced a number of challenges, including the North Korean and Iranian nuclear threats, troubles in the Middle East, and the humanitarian crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan. Reform of the UN itself was also a major issue. In 2011 Ban was elected to a second term.

 

Ban Ki-Moon, (born June 13, 1944, Ŭmsŏng, Japanese-occupied Korea [now in South Korea]), South Korean diplomat and politician, who served as the eighth secretary-general (2007–16) of the United Nations (UN).

At age 18 Ban won a competition that took him to the White House to meet U.S. Pres. John F. Kennedy, a visit that Ban claimed inspired his public career. He received a bachelor’s degree (1970) in international relations from Seoul National University and earned a master’s degree (1985) from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. After entering South Korea’s foreign service in 1970, he served as counselor to the embassy in Washington, D.C. (1987–90), director of American affairs at the Foreign Ministry (1990–92), deputy foreign minister (1995–96), and national security adviser to the president (1996–98). Following a stint as ambassador to Austria (1998–2000), Ban returned to Seoul as vice-minister of foreign affairs (2000–01). In 2003 he became foreign policy adviser to the new president, Roh Moo Hyun. As minister of foreign affairs and trade from 2004 to 2006, Ban played a key role in the six-party talks aimed at denuclearizing North Korea.

Ban’s UN experience began in 1975 when he became a staff member of the UN division of the Foreign Ministry in Seoul. In the late 1970s, when South Korea had only observer status, Ban was posted to the South Korean mission to the UN. In 1999 he served as chairman of the preparatory commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization. Ban also led the cabinet of the president of the UN General Assembly during South Korea’s tenure of the rotating presidency in 2001–02, the critical period following the terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, 2001 (see September 11 attacks).

On October 13, 2006, just days after North Korea tested a nuclear weapon, Ban was named UN secretary-general-elect. Though Ban’s quiet demeanour led some observers to question his ability to take on the daunting challenges facing the UN, others characterized him as an astute consensus builder who would be able to work effectively with both the Americans and the Chinese. Ban succeeded Kofi Annan on January 1, 2007, becoming the first Asian to serve as UN secretary-general since Burmese statesman U Thant held the office (1962–71). Ban faced a number of challenges, including the North Korean and Iranian nuclear threats, troubles in the Middle East, and the humanitarian crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan. Reform of the UN itself was also a major issue. In 2011 Ban was elected to a second term.

 

 

Ban Ki-Moon, (born June 13, 1944, Ŭmsŏng, Japanese-occupied Korea [now in South Korea]), South Korean diplomat and politician, who served as the eighth secretary-general (2007–16) of the United Nations (UN).

At age 18 Ban won a competition that took him to the White House to meet U.S. Pres. John F. Kennedy, a visit that Ban claimed inspired his public career. He received a bachelor’s degree (1970) in international relations from Seoul National University and earned a master’s degree (1985) from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. After entering South Korea’s foreign service in 1970, he served as counselor to the embassy in Washington, D.C. (1987–90), director of American affairs at the Foreign Ministry (1990–92), deputy foreign minister (1995–96), and national security adviser to the president (1996–98). Following a stint as ambassador to Austria (1998–2000), Ban returned to Seoul as vice-minister of foreign affairs (2000–01). In 2003 he became foreign policy adviser to the new president, Roh Moo Hyun. As minister of foreign affairs and trade from 2004 to 2006, Ban played a key role in the six-party talks aimed at denuclearizing North Korea.

Ban’s UN experience began in 1975 when he became a staff member of the UN division of the Foreign Ministry in Seoul. In the late 1970s, when South Korea had only observer status, Ban was posted to the South Korean mission to the UN. In 1999 he served as chairman of the preparatory commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization. Ban also led the cabinet of the president of the UN General Assembly during South Korea’s tenure of the rotating presidency in 2001–02, the critical period following the terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, 2001 (see September 11 attacks).

On October 13, 2006, just days after North Korea tested a nuclear weapon, Ban was named UN secretary-general-elect. Though Ban’s quiet demeanour led some observers to question his ability to take on the daunting challenges facing the UN, others characterized him as an astute consensus builder who would be able to work effectively with both the Americans and the Chinese. Ban succeeded Kofi Annan on January 1, 2007, becoming the first Asian to serve as UN secretary-general since Burmese statesman U Thant held the office (1962–71). Ban faced a number of challenges, including the North Korean and Iranian nuclear threats, troubles in the Middle East, and the humanitarian crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan. Reform of the UN itself was also a major issue. In 2011 Ban was elected to a second term.

 

 

Ban Ki-Moon, (born June 13, 1944, Ŭmsŏng, Japanese-occupied Korea [now in South Korea]), South Korean diplomat and politician, who served as the eighth secretary-general (2007–16) of the United Nations (UN).
At age 18 Ban won a competition that took him to the White House to meet U.S. Pres. John F. Kennedy, a visit that Ban claimed inspired his public career. He received a bachelor’s degree (1970) in international relations from Seoul National University and earned a master’s degree (1985) from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. After entering South Korea’s foreign service in 1970, he served as counselor to the embassy in Washington, D.C. (1987–90), director of American affairs at the Foreign Ministry (1990–92), deputy foreign minister (1995–96), and national security adviser to the president (1996–98). Following a stint as ambassador to Austria (1998–2000), Ban returned to Seoul as vice-minister of foreign affairs (2000–01). In 2003 he became foreign policy adviser to the new president, Roh Moo Hyun. As minister of foreign affairs and trade from 2004 to 2006, Ban played a key role in the six-party talks aimed at denuclearizing North Korea.

Ban Ki-Moon
Ban Ki-Moon, 2006.
© 360b/Shutterstock.com
Ban’s UN experience began in 1975 when he became a staff member of the UN division of the Foreign Ministry in Seoul. In the late 1970s, when South Korea had only observer status, Ban was posted to the South Korean mission to the UN. In 1999 he served as chairman of the preparatory commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization. Ban also led the cabinet of the president of the UN General Assembly during South Korea’s tenure of the rotating presidency in 2001–02, the critical period following the terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, 2001 (see September 11 attacks).
On October 13, 2006, just days after North Korea tested a nuclear weapon, Ban was named UN secretary-general-elect. Though Ban’s quiet demeanour led some observers to question his ability to take on the daunting challenges facing the UN, others characterized him as an astute consensus builder who would be able to work effectively with both the Americans and the Chinese. Ban succeeded Kofi Annan on January 1, 2007, becoming the first Asian to serve as UN secretary-general since Burmese statesman U Thant held the office (1962–71). Ban faced a number of challenges, including the North Korean and Iranian nuclear threats, troubles in the Middle East, and the humanitarian crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan. Reform of the UN itself was also a major issue. In 2011 Ban was elected to a second term.

Emmanuel Jal

Emmanuel Jal

Name Emmanuel Jal
Profession Activist
Date of Birth 1980-01-01
Place of Birth Sudan
Age
Death Date
Birth Sign Capricorn

About Emmanuel Jal

Activist and singer who is known for founding the charity organization Gua Africa. He is particularly known for his work in both the activism and music industries for aiming to end war and poverty in his home region of South Sudan. In 2014, he released his 5th full length studio album The Key.

Early Life of Emmanuel Jal

As a child, he was drafted into being a child soldier in Sudan. He was eventually smuggled out of Ethiopia, where he had been fighting, and adopted by a British aid worker. He subsequently attended school in Nairobi.

Trivia

He performed live at Nelson Mandela’s concert celebration for his 90th birthday. In 2014, he appeared in the film The Good Lie alongside Reese Witherspoon.

Family Life

He was born in South Sudan, and eventually raised throughout that region and Ethiopia.

Associated With

He collaborated with Nelly Furtado and Nile Rodgers on his 2014 album The Key.

Salva Kiir Mayardit

Salva Kiir Mayardit

Name Salva Kiir Mayardit
Profession Politician
Date of Birth 1951-09-13
Place of Birth Bahr el Ghazal,
Sudan
Age
Death Date
Birth Sign Virgo

About Salva Kiir Mayardit

Leader of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement who assumed office as the President of South Sudan in 2011. He was also the First Vice President of Sudan, from 2005 to 2011.

Early Life of Salva Kiir Mayardit

He fought with the separatist army in the First Sudanese Civil War.

Trivia

He also served as the Vice President of Sudan from 2005 to 2011.

Family Life

He has been married to Mary Ayen Mayardit.

Associated With

He succeeded John Garang as the President of Southern Sudan after his untimely 2005 death.

Nykhor Paul

Nykhor Paul

Name Nykhor Paul
Profession Model
Date of Birth 1970-01-01
Place of Birth Sudan
Age
Death Date
Birth Sign Taurus

About Nykhor Paul

Sudanese model who is recognized for her work with fashion industry titans Louis Vuitton, Balenciaga, Rick Owens, and Vivienne Westwood. In 2015 she sparked a controversial race debate on Instagram.

Early Life of Nykhor Paul

She grew up in Ethiopia as refugee due to having been displaced by a civil war in her native Sudan. She was discovered by a fashion scout at the age of 14.

Trivia

She was the focus of an editorial run by FRUK Magazine.

Family Life

She is originally from South Sudan.

Associated With

In an interview she acknowledged the impact that model Alek Wek had on the industry.